How to quit alcohol? The world’s smartest people quit – in record time

US editorial: Stop pretending Americans are content On Tuesday, the Ontario provincial government announced it will increase the minimum wage in Canada’s most populous province to $15 an hour from $11.60 by Jan. 1,…

How to quit alcohol? The world’s smartest people quit – in record time

US editorial: Stop pretending Americans are content

On Tuesday, the Ontario provincial government announced it will increase the minimum wage in Canada’s most populous province to $15 an hour from $11.60 by Jan. 1, 2019. On an election promise, Ontario Premier Doug Ford declared his support for the move, and proponents of the raise hoped Ford would use his win to secure federal support for the higher minimum wage across Canada.

Ontario’s news didn’t come as a surprise to the left in the United States. Last week, British Columbia introduced its own minimum wage hike to $13 an hour. Earlier this year, the New York City Council passed a similar hike to $15 an hour, expected to reach the City by the end of 2021. Similar efforts have been attempted in Los Angeles and Seattle.

That minimum wage hikes are an accepted part of economic life in the United States isn’t controversial; proponents of both business owners and state and local governments make the case that without such hikes, employees would not be compensated enough to cover basic living expenses, let alone achieve the American dream. In this way, the debate over minimum wage hikes can be viewed as a fight between affluent and impoverished residents of the United States. One group that gains benefits from the higher wages that accompany them is the retired.

Nevertheless, there are significant social and economic effects of this phenomenon. Conservatives tend to fight minimum wage hikes on grounds that they lead to job losses and higher prices, and that even having a higher wage does not lead to more jobs being created. Critics of left-wing minimum wage efforts say the wage hikes make it harder for lower-income workers to live independently and provide for their families, and reduces the incentives for companies to invest in their workforce.

Read the full editorial.

Next week on the PBS NewsHour: The Atlantic correspondent David Frum and University of Texas economist Sylvia Allegretto explore a growing debate over the affordable luxury housing crisis in America.

Leave a Comment